Meister Coehoom, pentagonal urban fortification, 1718

Meister Coehoom, pentagonal urban fortification, 1718

Why We Walk

Why Walking Helps Us Think

Project Hieroglyph: Fighting society's dystopian future - BBC News

Deadly Algorithms - Radical Philosophy

Tracing a Lineage of Tech-Minded Women Artists

Tracing a Lineage of Tech-Minded Women Artists

Sara M. Watson - Crash Course in Digital Literacy

http://map.ipviking.com/

Extensive Archive of Avant-Garde & Modernist Magazines (1890-1939) Now Available Online Open Culture

How to Teach Art

The Era of Big Work is Over

KEYWORDS

A (Polemical) Vocabulary of Contemporary Art is a long-term project examining contemporary art and language.

Dwarf Fortress

In the game Dwarf Fortress players set parameters and create a world. The worlds terrain and population is procedurally generated and then run through a fully simulated history until it is ready to play.

http://www.bay12games.com/dwarves/

Dwarf Fortress

In the game Dwarf Fortress players set parameters and create a world. The worlds terrain and population is procedurally generated and then run through a fully simulated history until it is ready to play.

http://www.bay12games.com/dwarves/

Go vote for my project Potential Communities on rhizome.org - right now! Voting for the five $500 internet art microgrants at Rhizome.org began yesterday.

I am proposing Potential Communities, a web-based application that will display a constant stream of randomly generated floor plans for utopian communities. These procedurally generated building layouts will draw in equal measure on historical utopian architecture, and the contemporary fantasies of computer games like Dwarven Fortress or Minecraft.

Each unique computer generated floor plan will depict a different kind of community, ranging from star-shaped communes to spread out garden cities. Such algorithmically imagined virtual communities could potentially serve as a blueprint for future physical communities. They will each provide a detailed look at the living spaces of a fictional community, divided into different zones of activity, and filled with all the features required for everyday life.

Using methods from computer games to formulate alternative architectural contexts for our everyday lives, I hope to help facilitate the invention of future communities. (The source code will be made available open source)

You will need to be a member of Rhizome (or become one)  to log in to vote. And help narrow the 140+ proposals to a list of 20, from which the Rhizome (to be announced soon) special guest juror will award five microgrants. Each voter will have three votes to be apportioned to three separate projects — once you vote for something, it disappears from the list. The proposals are spread out over 19 pages, but their order randomizes with each voter.

Go vote for my project Potential Communities on rhizome.org - right now! Voting for the five $500 internet art microgrants at Rhizome.org began yesterday.


I am proposing Potential Communities, a web-based application that will display a constant stream of randomly generated floor plans for utopian communities. These procedurally generated building layouts will draw in equal measure on historical utopian architecture, and the contemporary fantasies of computer games like Dwarven Fortress or Minecraft.

Each unique computer generated floor plan will depict a different kind of community, ranging from star-shaped communes to spread out garden cities. Such algorithmically imagined virtual communities could potentially serve as a blueprint for future physical communities. They will each provide a detailed look at the living spaces of a fictional community, divided into different zones of activity, and filled with all the features required for everyday life.

Using methods from computer games to formulate alternative architectural contexts for our everyday lives, I hope to help facilitate the invention of future communities. (The source code will be made available open source)


You will need to be a member of Rhizome (or become one) to log in to vote. And help narrow the 140+ proposals to a list of 20, from which the Rhizome (to be announced soon) special guest juror will award five microgrants. Each voter will have three votes to be apportioned to three separate projects — once you vote for something, it disappears from the list. The proposals are spread out over 19 pages, but their order randomizes with each voter.

Do we live in a 2-D hologram?
New Fermilab experiment will test the nature of the universe

http://www.fnal.gov/pub/presspass/press_releases/2014/2-D-Hologram-20140826.html

Do we live in a 2-D hologram? New Fermilab experiment will test the nature of the universe

http://www.fnal.gov/pub/presspass/press_releases/2014/2-D-Hologram-20140826.html